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University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Showing 1–30 of 2,587 items
  1. Alumni and Faculty Biographical (Alumni News Morgue) File (Born Digital Records)
    Collection

    Born Digital Records from the Alumni and Faculty Biographical (Alumni News Morgue) File, includes digitized material and born digital records pertaining to the biographical file from deceased and living alumni, faculty members, trustees, and former students. The file was created by the Alumni Association, but University Archives staff have added and continue to add materials...
  2. Amos Kennedy Collection
    Collection

    The Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr., Collection in the Rare Book & Manuscript Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign contains artists’ books, postcards, and posters. Kennedy is a letterpress printer, papermaker, book artist, and teacher who currently lives and works in York, Alabama. He was the first artist in residence at The Coleman Center for Arts and Culture, a...
  3. Cairo Bulletin
    Collection

    The Cairo Bulletin began publication in Cairo, Illinois, on December 21, 1868. Founded by John H. Oberly and Company (as the Cairo Evening Bulletin), it was one of only a few newspapers being published in Southern Illinois during its early run. Oberly meant for the newspaper to be “a new organ of Democratic sentiment,” and covered news, politics, and literature for the whole...
  4. Chicago Eagle
    Collection

    The Chicago Eagle was a primarily weekly newspaper published by Henry F. Donovan (and subsequently his son John M. Donovan) from 1889 to the mid-1940's. Donovan professed his title to be independent but it is seen to be a Democratic party publication devoted to municipal politics. Typical content included Donovan's fight against graft and corruption in local and state govern...
  5. Joliet Signal
    Collection

    The Joliet Signal (initially The Juliet Signal representing the original name of the city) began as the Juliet Courier and was sold to William E. Little in 1843 who subsequently changed the name. After a series of publisher changes, brothers Calvin and Calneh Zarley published and edited the paper for nearly 40 years. The Signal was considered to be the "Official Paper of the...
  6. LGBT at UIUC
    Collection

    "The Gay Illini organization was formed in 1975 and Illini Pride was founded in 1977, both growing out of the work of the Gay Liberation Front. Gay Illini was announced in the Daily Illini on January 29, 1975. By April 1975, the group was holding Gay Forums, offering panels discussing topics related to gay students and queer life. The group also hosted a number of social eve...
  7. Motley Collection of Theatre and Costume Design
    Collection

    The Motley Collection of Theatre and Costume Design is a valuable source of documentation on the history of theatre and is housed in The Rare Book and Manuscript Library. It is a rare collection of original materials on the theatre comprising over 5000 items from more than 150 productions in England and the United States. These materials include costume and set designs, sket...
  8. Portraits of Actors
    Collection

    Portraits of Actors, 1720-1920, includes almost 3,500 pictures of actors — studio portraits and actors posing in costume for a particular role or performing a scene from a play. Dramatists, theatrical managers, singers and musicians are also included, but the majority are British and American actors who worked between about 1770 and 1893. Among the hundreds of actors include...
  9. The Broad Ax
    Collection

    The Broad Ax began as a weekly publication founded, published and edited by former Virginia slave Julius F. Taylor. The newspaper began in Salt Lake City in 1895 but disputes with the Latter-Day Saints led Taylor to move his publication to Chicago in 1899, where he continued his focus on being "Democratic in politics, advocating the immortal principles of Jefferson and Jacks...
  10. The Rock Island Argus
    Collection

    The Rock Island Argus is one of Illinois' oldest newspapers, having been in continuous publication since 1851 when F. S. Nichols founded The Rock Island Republican. In 1854, Colonel J. B. Danforth purchased the paper and changed the name to The Rock Island Argus, as he was an avid Democrat who wanted to avoid any perceived affiliation with the opposing party. In 1882, John W...
  11. Southern Africa
    Image | 1889

  12. Rev. William Weston Patton
    Image | 1910

    From text: "Another whose work stands out conspicuously is the Rev. W. W. Patton, D.D., of the First Congregational Church. Dr. Patton was an uncompromising Abolitionist." Photograph is undated but appears to be from the 1880s.
  13. Mary A. Bickerdyke
    Image | 1910

    Caption: "Mrs. Mary A. (""Mother"") Bickerdyke (Organizer of Military Hospitals and Friend of the Soldiers) By Courtesy of the Chicago Historical Society". Mary Bickerdyke was a volunteer nurse and hospital administrator for Union soldiers during the Civil War. From text: "I cannot refrain from going outside the local record to say a word about Mrs. Mary A. Bickerdyke, o...
  14. Rev. William W. Everts
    Image | 1910

    and though he was absent when the secession crisis came to a head, it is said that the influence of the people of his old congregation was most effective in holding Kentucky to the side of the Union. Dr. Everts was probably the most forceful preacher in the history of the city's pulpit."
  15. Rev. Robert H. Clarkson
    Image | 1910

    and this promise was in after years fulfilled."
  16. Levi D. Boone
    Image | 1910

    From text: "Other notables of the "Old Guard" who arrived in the thirties, and were for the most part in hale and hearty middle life, were … Levi D. Boone (a stalwart Know-nothing)…" Levi D. Boone (1808-1882) was a doctor, captain in the Black Hawk War, and mayor of Chicago (1855-1856). (Source: Encyclopedia of Chicago.) Image is undated but appears to be from the 1860s.
  17. Thomas Hoyne
    Image | 1910

    From text: "Other notables of the "Old Guard"" who arrived in the thirties, and were for the most part in hale and hearty middle life, were … Thomas Hoyne, …." Thomas Hoyne (1817-1883) was a justice of the peace and mayor of Chicago (1876). (Source: Encyclopedia of Chicago.) Image is undated but appears to be from the 1860s.
  18. Dr. Charles Volney Dyer
    Image | 1910

    From text: "Other notables … who arrived in the thirties … [were] ... Dr. C. V. Dyer …" Charles Volney Dyer (1808-1878) was a physician and abolitionist. (Source: Encyclopedia of Chicago.) Photograph is undated but appears to be from the 1860s.
  19. Judge Mark Skinner
    Image | 1910

    From text: "Other notables … who arrived in the thirties … [were] Judge Mark Skinner …" Mark Skinner (1813-1887) was a Cook County judge and city attorney. (Source: Encyclopedia of Chicago.) Photo is undated but appears to be from the 1860s.
  20. John V. Farwell
    Image | 1910

    and that one was John V. Farwell, to whom all in any manner benefited by the evangelist owe a debt of gratitude."
  21. Haymarket Square
    Image | 1906

    Caption: "Haymarket Square is noted the world over as the scene of the anarchistic outrage on the night of May 4, 1886, when a bomb was hurled into the midst of a number of policemen who were attempting to disperse a disorderly crowd. In the center of the square stands a statue of a policeman with uplifted hand, erected to the memory of the officers who perished that night....
  22. Michigan Avenue, showing Auditorium
    Image | 1906

    Caption: "Michigan Avenue, showing the Auditorium[.] Michigan Avenue lies along the lake front and is a favorite driveway. No obstructing buildings lie between it and the lake and the cool breezes make it a most inviting thoroughfare on a warm day. The Auditorium Building, one of the largest in the whole country, covering an area of sixty-two thousand feet, is located be...
  23. Palmer House
    Image | 1906

    Caption: "This famous hotel, at the corner of State and Monroe streets, was built shortly after the great fire by Potter Palmer, to whose estate it now belongs. Many great political deals were consummated within its walls, and its name is known from the Atlantic to the Pacific."
  24. C. D. Peacock
    Image | 1922

    From text: "Elijah Peacock came here in 1837 and engaged in his trade of Jeweler and Watch Repairer, a calling that had already descended through three generations, following the English custom, and which his son, Charles (C. D.), who was born in 1838, and who has been one of our leading men in that line, tells me will be continued indefinitely, as the mantel is slipping fro...
  25. Kenwood Club
    Image | 1888

    From text: "From this meeting resulted the present Kenwood Club, the organization of which was perfected in February, 1884. In June of the same year the Club took possession of the house on Forty-seventh Street, near Lake Avenue, which was formerly the residence of Norman B. Judd, Esq. To this house, a two story and basement frame building, a large addition, 40x75 feet, wa...
  26. Park Club
    Image | 1888

    From text: "The Park Club had its beginning at a social gathering of the leading gentlemen of South Park early in the spring of 1886. … The selection of its name was the natural sequence of its unrivalled location in the midst of the grand system of parks and boulevards, over whose thousands of acres of lawn and lake its windows look. While the majority of the members of th...
  27. Gateway to Oak Woods Cemetery
    Image | 1893

    Caption: "Gateway to Oakwoods (sic) Cemetery." From text: "This beautiful cemetery stands in the front rank, as one of the handsomest of Chicago's burial grounds. It is located south of 67th St. between Cottage Grove Ave. and the I. C. R. R. track. The distance from the business center is about seven miles. ... In drawing the plan for the grounds, the Association was for...
  28. Entrance to Waldheim Cemetery
    Image | 1893

    From text: "Situated in the town of Harlem, on the Desplaines River, and about nine miles from the city, is a German cemetery of exceptional beauty in its general aspect as well as in the tasteful and pleasing manner … Like most of the other large cemeteries, Waldheim is open to all, and makes no distinction between the believer or unbeliever, between Christian, Jew or Heat...
  29. Kinzie's residence
    Image | 1869

    From text: "The first white man who became a permanent settler here was Mr. John Kinzie, an Indian trader, who crossed the lake from St. Joseph, Michigan, in 1804. He was the founder of the commerce of Chicago … Outside the fort Chicago then consisted of but five houses: first, Mr. Kinzie's, on the north side of the river, opposite the fort..."
  30. Chamber of Commerce
    Image | 1869

    and above this the grand hall, where the members of the Board of Trade assemble daily. The building is surmounted by a Mansard roof, pierced with oval windows, the corners ornamented with urns. The entrance consists of four handsome Corinthian columns, from which spring three arches supporting a handsome balcony, underneath which a broad flight of stairs leads to the first...